Welding Engineering resistance welding and fusion welding

As an expert welding engineer, I bring together the complex engineering disciplines of materials science, design, inspection, mechanical and electronic systems, lasers, and robotics in order to:

  • Develop and review welding procedures to ensure adequacy and conformance to customer requirements.
  • Develop construction and in-service inspection procedures.
  • Develop fabrication strategies while anticipating and solving fabrication problems.
  • Develop repair procedures.
  • Supervise critical welding and repairs.
  • Determine weldability of materials.

Resistance welding involves the generation of heat by passing large amounts of current through the resistance caused by the contact between two or more metal surfaces. Small pools of molten metal are formed at the weld area as high current is passed through the metal. Resistance welding methods are efficient and cause little pollution. However, their applications are limited and the equipment cost is high.

 fusion welding

Shielded Metal Arc Fusion Welding

Read more about my welding engineering experience.

Fusion welding uses a welding power supply to create an electric arc between an electrode and work-piece to melt the metals. Either direct (DC) or alternating (AC) current, and consumable or non-consumable electrodes are used. The welding region is protected by a shielding gas, and/or slag. Weldability Testing My experience includes as a welding engineer working with resistance welding, fusion welding, and the testing required to ensure that these technical welding techniques have the integrity that your project requires.

Weldability testing

My experience includes as a welding engineer working with resistance welding, fusion welding, and the testing required to ensure that these technical welding techniques have the integrity that your project requires.

Weldability testing

The varistraint test is used to determine the susceptibility of an alloy to cracking during or soon after welding, known as "hot cracking". This phenomenon often occurs during welding of expensive alloys. Ed Dalder uses this and other specialized tests to determine the weldability of these alloys.

The weldability of a material refers to its ability to be welded. Weldability testing can be defined for various materials, but some welding processes work better for a given material than others. Even within a certain process the quality of the weld will vary depending on parameters, such as the electrode material, shielding gases, welding speed, and cooling rate, and must be determined by weldability testing, which is usually determined by a welding engineer.

 

Material

Arc welding
Oxy-acetylene welding
Electron beam welding
Resistance welding
Brazing
Soldering
Adhesive bonding
Cast IronCRN SDNC
Carbon Steel and Low-alloy Steel R R C R R D C
Stainless Steel R C C R R C C
Aluminum and Magnesium C C C C C S R
Copper and Copper Alloys C C C C R C C
Nickel and Nickel Alloys R C C R R C C
Titanium C N C C D S C
Lead and Zinc C C N D N R R
Thermoplastic N N N N N N C
Thermosets N N N N N N C
Elastomers N N N N N N R
Ceramics N S C N N N R
Dissimilar Metals D D C D D/C R R
†Heated tool = R; Hot gas = R; Induction = C Key: C = Commonly performed; R = Recommended; D = Difficult; S = Seldom; N = Not used

Contact me to learn how my welding engineering services can help
your project.